Monthly Archives: July 2015

Inspiration: Knitted Food

This post is inspired by a friend of mine, Wendy.  Wendy is a fantastic knitter, but she has a little quirk.  She almost exclusively knits toy food.

I know!  How fantastic is that?

She makes big picnic baskets of food, cornucopias of food, full Thanksgiving dinners, and an array of “fresh” fruits and vegetables that would make a greengrocer (ahem) green with envy.

Let’s spend today talking about knit food, in Wendy’s honor.  (And because knit food is ridiculously cute!)

You could always go the healthy route, and knit up some lovely produce:

Pears…

Pear-fecto! by Susan B. Anderson5334391790_5a3c048656_z[1]Mushrooms…

Knitted ‘Shrooms by Abby Kroken

mushrooms_medium[1]Carrots…

Heirloom Carrot by Sara Hills

carrots3_medium2[1]And peas.

Peas in a Pod by Hansi Singh3937321083_af8cc2990c_z[1]But sometimes you’re in the mood for something a little fancier.  A nice plate of sushi perhaps?

Sushi by Joanna Rankin

group1_medium2[1]And, of course, there’s always room for milk and cookies after a delicious (knit) meal.

Milk and Cookie by Raynor Gellatly

2668565040_c301b7640c_z[1]Have you ever knit food?  Are you going to now?  (I might- these projects are just too cute to ignore.)

What should I be reading?

I have a confession to make.

I am a (clearly) avid blogger- I’ve consistently written three posts a week for the last two and half years.  I like the idea of blogs, and I think they’re totally worthwhile and can be amazing.

But (and here is the confession), I haven’t consistently read any knitting blogs (or any blogs, really) since I started On the Needles.

I know!  Heresy!

Back in the day, and several computers ago, I had a whole list of a dozen or more blogs that I’d check nearly every day.

Now, I can’t remember their names.  And the ones I do remember seem to have lapsed.

Through the Loops has changed its name, and hasn’t been updated since May.ThroughTheLoops-Logo[1]The Mason-Dixon Knitting ladies haven’t posted since February.511RlvWDFBL[1]And, the Purl Bee has completely changed- It looks like an online store now.

header-sticky-logoTell me that there are still good knitting blogs out there.  I know there has to be, but where are they?  What should I be reading?  I need to up my blog-reading game.

Pattern: Committee Socks

We’ve done it, guys!  We’ve finished our socks.  The ones we started talking about way back in March.

You picked out the item, the style and even the colors.  And, over the last couple months, we’ve been knitting up the socks piece by piece.

And, here’s the day we’ve been waiting for!  It’s Finished Sock Day!

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They are the perfect comfy-cozy everyday socks. Featuring a classic ribbed leg with bold stripes of contrasting color and a slip-stitch reinforced heel, these socks are perfect for hiking up to your mountain cabin, beachcombing on the Puget Sound or lounging in front of the fireplace. Simple, classic, cozy and perfect.

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Thanks, everyone for your input!  I hope you had fun working on these socks together… I know I did.

Want a nice copy of the finished pattern?  Get it here:

Committee Socks.docx

 

Blocking: Socks

I think my favorite thing to block might be socks.  This is pretty silly, since you really don’t have to block socks.  (I suppose, technically, you don’t have to block anything, really.  But some projects, like lace, you kind of have to block.)

Since socks are worn skin-tight, they look like they’ve been blocked while you’re wearing them.  But, if you’re giving someone a pair of socks as a gift (or you’re just making them for yourself), there is nothing prettier than a nicely blocked pair of brand-new hand-knit socks.

And the process couldn’t be easier.

Just soak your finished socks in clean, warm water for 10 or 20 minutes (like usual), and slip them onto your sock blockers and let them dry.  (Mine hang dry from the ugly chandelier in my kitchen.) Easy!

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What’s that?  You haven’t heard of sock blockers?  Well, let me tell you about them, because they’re basically magical, especially if you make a lot of socks.

Sock blockers are rigid, sock-shaped frames that will produce professionally-finished and identically-shaped socks every time.  They come in lots of sizes and are made with many different kinds of materials (wood, acrylic, and metal are common.  Mine are made from wire).  You can even make your own, though I think they’re totally worth the 15 or so bucks they cost.

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You’re not convinced?  OK, I get that.  Why spend money on a unitasker that you’ll only use now and then?  If you don’t have sock blockers, and don’t plan on buying them, you can always block with foam and pins, just like normal.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATwo things are very important to keep in mind.  First: make sure you are blocking both socks to the same dimensions.  You wouldn’t believe the number of lopsided pairs of socks I made before I got my sock blockers.

And second:  Do your best to avoid puckers and points from your pins.  They’re really obvious on socks.  To avoid points, I use lots and lots of pins to spread out the tension around the edge of the sock, and I stick the pins in away from the edge.

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Not good

Good

Better

Either way you do it, blocking socks takes something that looks like a lame, wrinkly snake, and changes it into a beautiful, professional-looking accessory.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHow do you block your socks?