Category Archives: Patterns

New Pattern: Stanwood Shawl

We might all still be stuck inside, but that doesn’t mean I can’t get excited about bringing you a new pattern!

Introducing: the Stanwood Shawl, in the new collection from Knit Picks, Vivid!

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I’m really pleased with how this one turned out!  It’s a lovely, squishy, garter-stitch scarf/shawl hybrid that features contrasting stripes along one edge and short-row points.  It features a slightly curved shape, which lets it settle gently around the shoulders.  And, best of all I love the way it lets you play with color.  Mix and match your favorite 3 (or more!) skeins of sock yarn, and see how they play together.  Fun!

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Plus, it’s nice and long.  If you’re more of a scarf person than a shawl person- it’s perfect!

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(Also, I gotta say, Knit Picks have some fun, bright designs in this collection.  Definitely check it out!)

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Head over and grab a copy of the Stanwood Shawl here!

New Pattern: U-District Pullover

It’s the perfect day for a new pattern- especially this one!

It’s cold, gross, and I’ve just about had it up to here* with this February weather.

(*My eyebrows)

It’s the perfect time for my most ridiculous sweater yet!

Introducing, the U-District Pullover!52774220_08

Why is it ridiculous, you ask?

Well, it’s super oversized- meant to be worn with at least 6 inches of positive ease, but, really just about as much as you want.  It’s made from super-soft, bulky merino and beautiful laceweight alpaca held double (color blocking!), so it knits up in about fifteen minutes (give or take) and is super cozy.

And, the sleeves!  The sleeves might be the most ridiculous part.  There’s zero shaping on the sleeves until you get to the cuffs, when you decrease all the way down, which leaves you with big, poofy, ridiculous (and ridiculously cozy) 80’s-style sleeves.

The pattern is beyond simple (perfect Movie Knitting), but the finished effect is super fun, if I say so myself.

52774220_02Don’t get me wrong, this might be a ridiculous sweater, but dang if I don’t love it.  It’s one of my more out-there designs and I gotta say I’m really pleased with how it turned out.

Oh! And by the way, it’s part of the “Better Together” collection from Knit Picks!  I’m currently considering making myself a Riant Pullover or maybe a Continuation Blanket with some of my stash yarn.33761

Head on over to Knit Picks to pick up a copy of my U-District Pullover!

Pattern: Kells Wrap

I ended 2019 with a pattern, and I’m starting 2020 with one, too!

This one’s a little bigger, though, and a little more complex.

It’s a giant, cozy, wrap, every inch covered with intricate cables!  Introducing: the Kells Wrap!52761220_02.jpg

This bad boy is what you will reach for when you really just want to wander around town, wrapped up in a blanket.  It’s thick, it’s cozy and it’s (if I say so myself) really beautiful.

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I’ll be honest, it’s not for the faint of heart, or the first-time cable knitter, but it’s not so complex that it’s impossible to make.  The design was inspired by the illustrations in the Book of Kells (an illuminated manuscript, and one of Ireland’s national treasures).  It’s complex, but it repeats  in an orderly way, so once you’ve worked a couple repeats, you should be able to more or less memorize the design.

If you’re looking for this and other cabled treats, head over and pick up Knit Picks’ new collection, Entwined!

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Or you can get just my pattern here!

New Pattern: Radish Pullover

It’s almost Christmas, and I have a present for you!

It’s the pattern for my Radish Pullover!  It turned out so well, that I just had to write it up.  And I hope you like it, too.

IMG_2276It’s a fairly simple bottom up, seamless pullover with a V-neck and 2×2 ribbing around the cuffs, hem and collar.  There is a fully-charted stranded Radish motif that runs across the sleeves and belly, and the pattern is sized from 0-6 months up to 8-10 years.

This sweater is a great way to use up those partial skeins of sock yarn that I’m sure you have laying around your stash.  The brown doesn’t use more than a half skein, and the radish colors (green, red and white) are only used for a handful of rows each.

And the best part? Since the inspiration for this sweater came from my kid’s favorite book, Sheep in a Jeep, I’m donating all proceeds from this pattern to the Children’s Literacy Initiative, a fantastic organization that supports teachers and their students to help every kid learn how to read.   I’m trying a “Pay what you can” model this time, so you can get the pattern for free, or donate up to $15 (or whatever feels right to you).IMG_2257

So, head on over to Ravelry and pick up a copy of the Radish Pullover so you can make a sweater for your favorite little reader!

New Pattern: Olympic Pullover

I know- it’s crazy, but I’ve another new sweater for you!  Exciting!

This one’s feels pretty on the nose for me, as it’s just starting to get cooler out, and I’m dreaming of getting into the thick of fall.  And there’s nothing that says “autumn” to me better than a thick, cabled, over-sized wool sweater.  (Though, honestly, this is really more of a “deep winter” sweater if you’re a normal person, and not a cold-blooded lizard person like me.  My husband tried it on and managed maybe five minutes before he started to overheat.)

It’s the Olympic Pullover!52715220_06.jpgIt’s named after the Olympic Peninsula, the gorgeous part of Washington between the Puget sound and the Pacific Ocean.  It’s full of lush forests, misty coastline and snowy peaks.  (And it’s where Twilight was based, if that gives you an idea.  Though I imagine that people that live over there don’t love that reference.)  It’s the perfect place to traipse around in a woolly cabled pullover.52715220_15.jpgThis sweater is beyond simple- dropped shoulders mean almost no shaping, and everything’s worked in pieces and sewn up, so it would make nice travel knitting.  Plus, the cables look super-complicated, but once you get them established, they’re pretty simple. 52715220_12

You can get a copy of the pattern here, or grab the whole collection (highly recommended- there’s some great sweaters in here!) here.

Pattern: Piper’s Creek Pullover

Woo hoo!  It’s a pattern day!

And this one’s a little out of my usual wheelhouse, because:

  1. It’s a fingering-weight sweater worked on US3’s.  Why? Because I’m a crazy person.
  2. It’s colorwork!  I love how colorwork looks, but all things being equal, I think I’m more of a cables person.  I love a big squishy sweater. (OK, I love making a big cabled sweater.  I’d wear either in a heartbeat.)

Anyway, without further ado, let me introduce the Piper’s Creek Pullover!52724220_09It’s a long-sleeved yoked pullover, made with Palette yarn from Knit Picks (though you could use really any fingering-weight wool).  It uses at least 7 (count em) different colors (great for using up leftover scraps!), but could be easily modified to use as many colors as you have on hand.  I made mine for my husband with a gray background and blue, red and yellow details.  It’s a great unisex sweater, and a fun, simple knit (assuming you don’t mind miles of US3 stockinette).

52724220_13.jpgI will say one thing though- the neck on the sample in these pictures ended up kind of funny, so if you want to make a Piper’s Creek Pullover (which I highly recommend), here’s what I would do to avoid the weird neck.  First, make sure that you’re only doing the number of short rows called for in the pattern, or maybe even reduce the number by one or two, just in case.  Second, make sure to work the colorwork nice and loosely (tight shoulders will make the neck funnel up, like it is in the pictures).  And third, make sure to block the sweater so the neck goes nice and smoothly into the shoulders.  Worst case scenario, if the neck ends up terrible even with all those precautions, you can always rip it out from the top down (or cut it out), pick up your neck stitches and work the neck and collar that you prefer after the sweater’s done.  (Though, that seems like a lot of work…)52724220_14

Want to pick up a copy? Grab the Piper’s Creek Pullover pattern here!  Or get the whole Palette collection here!

Pattern: Unspooled Dishcloth

Are any of you guys sewers (er… sew-ers? Sewists? People who sew)?  Have I got a dishcloth for you!

It’s the Unspooled Dishcloth!  It’s a super-cute dishcloth worked in the shape of a spool of thread.56122220

It’s super simple, and really versatile.  The “spool” part is worked in seed stitch, and the “thread” is worked with garter stitch.  I think this would be a fun way to use up scraps of yarn (rainbow thread!) or a great variegated (variegated thread!), or just use your favorite color.  How cute would a whole set of these be with matching spools, and coordinating thread colors?56122220_3

And best of all, the pattern is free!  Head on over to Knit Picks to pick up your copy!

Pattern: Truly Everyday Socks

Time for another new pattern!  It’s one that’s dear to my heart (or feet). And it’s in Knit Picks’ newest collection: Simply Socks, which is all about those socks you want to knit again and again and wear every day.75339D

These are my Truly Everyday Socks.  If you’re related to me, they’re probably really familiar to you, because I’ve been making them for years and have been given out on more than one Christmas morning.YPxPiMmk
They’re a super-simple top-down sock with 2×2 ribbing at the top, a turned, reinforced heel and nice, neat toe.  I’ve covered the leg and instep with a really simple knit/purl basket-weave pattern that you’ll be able to memorize before you’re even an inch into the first sock. RG62pByRI love these socks.  I’ve made probably a dozen pairs using this basic pattern over the years.  They’re unisex and utilitarian, but not boring (to wear or knit), and could easily be sized up or down.  Plus, they’re a great way to show off that special skein of hand-dyed yarn you’ve got squirreled away.

Head over to Knit Picks and pick up a copy of my Truly Everyday Socks, and make yourself a pair (or twelve).

Pattern: Parkside Throw

I know you’re probably tired of hearing about this gosh dang blanket, but I am so stinking proud of how it turned out that you’re going to have to hear me out once more.  But this time, I promise I’ll make it worth your time.

Because I wrote up the pattern, and here it is for free!

IMG_1902This blanket was so fun to work on (sure it took forever, but It wasn’t the bad kind of forever)!  It’s a simple 2-row repeat (and one of those rows is just knitting), so it’s perfect tv knitting. It’s a great way to really indulge in your favorite worsted/dk yarn (though I highly recommend trying the madelinetosh Farm Twist– it was an absolute delight). IMG_1895 The simple pattern of the blanket lends itself to all manner of interesting stripe combinations.  I like the simple asymmetric scheme I’ve got here, but you could do even stripes all the way up, random stripes with scrap yarn, or maybe a big old rainbow!  How fun would that be?IMG_1848_adjustedAs written, the Parkside Throw is a generously-sized throw blanket, big enough for two to snuggle up with on the couch (or big enough for a single blanket-hog), but the pattern could easily be modified.  Add more pattern repeats for a larger bed-sized blanket, or reduce the number for a baby blanket or lap warmer.

And, if you start now, it’ll be big enough to snuggle up under by the time the weather starts to cool down.

Get the free pattern here!

Parkside Throw Pattern

New Pattern (s)! Dishcloth Madness!

OK, maybe not madness, per se, but I’ve somehow fallen behind on telling you about my new patterns.  (I know… heresy!)

I’ve got two brand-new, free patterns with Knit Picks that I’d like to share with you.  Technically, they call for Knit Picks’ Dishie yarn, but really, you could use whatever dishcloth cotton you’ve got laying around. (Though, Dishie is actually really nice for washcloths.)

Pattern the first!

It’s the Twined Dishcloth!  Super classy, super classic.  This bad boy would look great in just about anyone’s kitchen.  It’s a great way to practice cables, and/or reading a chart. I love using dishcloths as a low-pressure way to practice new stitches.  I might not want to try a new technique as part of a big old sweater that might not turn out.  But, a dishcloth is going to be useful, even if it doesn’t turn out how I imagine it in my head.Twined Dishcloth

And second, it’s the Mitered Quarters Dishcloth.  Is it mitered? No.  Is it divided into quarters? No.  Am I bad at naming things? Yes.

But, despite the dumb name, it’s a cute little dishcloth- very modern and sleek (or as sleek as a dishcloth ever is).  If the Twined dishcloth is a great way to try working cables, this guy is a great way to try working short rows.  You cast on on the long side of the green section, then work short rows all the way to the tip of the light gray section, then work longer and longer rows until you get to the bottom of the blue section and bind off.  (Trust me, it makes sense once you’re doing it.)  And, it’s a great way to use up those little balls of yarn that are too big to throw away, but too small to really do anything with.Mitered Quarters Dishcloth

I love when I realize that I have a pattern coming out- sharing my patterns with you all is the best, and even better when I suddenly have two to share! I hope you enjoy them, too!

Do you ever make dishcloths?  What’s your favorite dishcloth pattern?