Tag Archives: sweater vest

Knitting on the TV

It’s been a minute since I’ve gotten really excited about knitting in a movie or on TV, but I think I might have found my next project. (Ha! Like I need another project.)

Ya’ll know I’ve been watching Dark on Netflix. It’s very moody and (well) dark. There’s lots of rain and nighttime scenes, and of course lots of knitwear and very good coats.

Plus, part of the story takes place in the 50s- the heyday of knitting, in my opinion. Knitting in the 50s was all vests and sweater sets worked on tiny needles with fingering weight yarn. It would drive me nuts to do it, but man, I love how the finished product looks.

Speaking of the finished product, look at this amazing sweater vest! (And don’t worry- no spoilers here, unless you consider a kid with a very good sweater vest a spoiler.)

And a close-up:

I mean, that color, that all-over texture, the 1×1 rib edging, the v-neck. It might be the perfect sweater vest. So stinking cute. I kind of want to make one for everyone in my family. Or at least for my kid. After all, making a vest for a 2-year-old on US2s is much less daunting than making one for myself. I’m thinking I could even use sock yarn to make sure it’s machine-washable and can stand up to a very busy toddler.

The thing I think I like most about this sweater is the geometric knit/purl texture. It doesn’t look particularly tricky, but when it’s worked all over the whole piece, it really packs a punch.

In fact, I like it so much I couldn’t stop myself from “sketching” it out and making up a little chart. (Empty squares are knits, dots are purls. Also, for what it’s worth, I haven’t actually swatched this out yet, so it might be wildly off. It’s just my best guess, based on obsessively looking up screenshots of this vest.)

I’m not sure if I’ve got the time/energy/follow-through right now to actually make this sweater become a reality, but man it’s fun to daydream. Maybe it’ll become a pattern?

Has any TV knitting caught your eye lately?

Prince George

Oh my goodness, have you guys seen Prince George’s adorable little Christmas sweater?  It’s freaking too cute to handle.   Look at those chubby cheeks (and Christmas shorts?  The British are odd). (Thanks to my friend Jenny for sending me his picture!)

_79710177_princegeorge2[1]Apparently you can’t buy the the royal sweater vest, but we’re knitters.  We don’t need to buy sweaters like common folks (or like the Duchess of Cambridge).  Let’s take a look at the sweater originally from Cath Kidston.

sweater16n-3-web[1]It’s pretty simple,  right?  Just a standard stockinette sweater vest with teeny tiny palace guards on the bottom. If you wanted to make one, just start with a simple vest pattern in navy blue:

Baby’s Banded Sweater Vest by Lisa K. Ross

DSC_0055__2__medium2[1]And work the little palace guards along the bottom.  You could work them with intarsia, or if you wanted to make it even easier on yourself, why not use the duplicate stitch?

I’ve even worked up some palace guard charts, as a Christmas present for you!  (Click the picture for a larger version

Prince George Sweater ChartNow you can make a sweater for your little prince, too!

Inspiration: The Bletchley Circle

Have you seen this new miniseries on PBS?  It’s pretty much made for me.  It’s a crime procedural drama, costume drama, and (as Netflix is always suggesting for me) a Witty British Drama Featuring a Strong Female Lead.

Actually, it features several strong female leads.  The main characters are a group of ex-code breakers that worked at Bletchley Park during World War II.  Apparently I wasn’t paying attention in history class, because I had never heard of it.  Apparently much/most of the codebreaking in WWII was done by women, which is pretty neat.

Anyway, the ladies of Bletchley Park have had to go back to civilian life after the war, and are made to sign a non-disclosure act, so they can’t even tell their husbands about their wartime efforts.  They’re all sort of bored and unhappy with their civilian lives, after the excitement of being codebreakers.  But, then they discover a serial killer and investigate him as they fight against the clock to prevent him from killing again.  It’s all terribly exciting.  The last episode ended with a huge cliffhanger, and I’m itching to figure out what happens!

But, when the ladies of Bletchley Circle aren’t fighting Nazis or hunting down serial killers, they’re knitting:

Bletchley 1

They even use yarn as a crime-fighting tool (see it on the map in the background?)

Bletchley 9

Bletchley 7

All the characters have fantastic hand-knit sweaters.

Bletchley 8

Bletchley 4

And even though the percentage of sweater vests is a little high for my taste, I won’t complain too loudly.

Bletchley 6

Bletchley 5

Bletchley 3

Want to get in the spirit of the Bletchley Circle?  I wouldn’t recommend chasing after a serial killer, but maybe try one of these cardigans instead:

Vitruvia Vest and Cardigan by Marilyn King

Vitruvia-Vest_medium

Neon by Joji Locatelli

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Anais by Kim Hargreaves

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