Tag Archives: colorwork

Christmas Post-Mortem: A hat

Christmas is done!  Hope you had a nice weekend.  We played lots of board games, and ate lots of cookies.  A pretty great time, if I say so myself.

But here’s the fun part!  Now I get to show off the gifts I’ve been working on over the last few months!

Let’s start with this cool hat I made for my brother-in-law!img_4099I knit with a very cool “intarsia in the round” technique that I learned at this year’s Knit Fit.  Basically, you cast on and do the brim just like normal (in the round).  Then, as you knit the top (multi-colored) part of the hat, you use really long short rows and wrap-and-turns to work the intarsia without messing up the order of your yarn.  So, you’re effectively knitting back and forth at the same time you are creating a tube that looks like it was knit in the round.  Super clever!

And, it’s got this cool top (which looks better when it’s worn):img_4102It’s dead simple to make.  You knit all the way to the top of the hat without any shaping (making it extra-long), then you seam the top to make the whole thing flat, then take the corners and sew them together.

Cool, right?

What did you make for Christmas?

Project Tea Cozy: In The Belly of The Beast?

Last week I did my first try at writing up the Tea Cozy pattern.

This week I did a bunch of knitting (and proofreading)!

Remember that math I did last week?  I determined that I needed about 120 sts around the belly of the pot.  I could just cast on 120 sts, but I want the ribbing at the bottom  to be a little tighter.  I think it’ll look better that way.

I figured if I want to increase about 1 st per 8, that should give me the result I’m looking for- just a little tighter, without any weird puckering.  So, a little more math, a bit of estimation, and I’ll cast on 106 sts.

I worked a p2 (k2p2) rib for a generous half inch (5 rows), then worked an increase row to get me up to 120 sts.

Then it was colorwork time!  img_3348Hoo boy, did I underestimate the amount of ends I would be generating!  So many stripes, so many color changes.  Oops!  At least it looks pretty.

Also, I want to bring your attention to a detail I’m really proud of.  Look at the edge of the handle hole (I really need a better word for that):img_3370See the brown edge?  I made a little mini-skein of brown for each side, and used intarsia to work a few stitches of garter stitch to keep the ends from curling.  I think it makes the tea cozy look really professional.

Now I just have to figure out how I want to make the hole for the spout…  Hmm.

Project Tea Cozy: Let’s Begin

I’ve got the gauge, I’ve got the stitch pattern, and I’ve got the design in my head.  It’s time to start getting this pattern on paper.

I’ll start by measuring my teapot.  19″ around the fattest part, which, with some math, can give me my stitch count.

img_3316Then I’ll sketch out my design, adding in notes about all the details- where the increases will be, what stitch pattern to use, etc.  I’m going to make this tea pot like a modified hat.  So, I’ll start from the bottom and work up, but I’m going to knit flat (until I make it to the “crown”).  That will make it easy to make the big hole for the handle; I’ll just sew up an inch or so at the hem, and voila!  Tea cozy.  (Or at least that’s the plan.)img_3331Then, starting with the cast on at the bottom, I write a first draft of the pattern, knowing that a bunch of it will be wrong.  But that’s OK, that’s what first drafts are for!img_3337Then, I finalized the stitch pattern…

Oh.  Except…

I totally used up most of the yarn I was planning on using (I got excited about another project and used up almost all the red and yellow and blue… oops!)img_3323Well, I’ve got lots of neutrals, so I guess this teapot will be more neutral than bright and colorful.  Ooh!  I can use neutrals for the stripes and colors for the dots.  That should look cute!img_3342OK, now that everything’s set up and beautiful, it’s time to start knitting!  (And time to start figuring out where all my mistakes are!)

Project Tea Cozy: The Swatch

Woo! It’s tea cozy time!  (Almost.)

I know no one likes swatching, me included.  (And, if I’m being honest, I rarely make a swatch if I’m following someone else’s pattern.)  But, when you’re designing a pattern making a swatch is an absolute necessity.

So I pulled out my favorite colors and made one great big swatch with three different patterns, to see which I liked best.

The first pattern was a wide stripe-and-polka dot combo.  I like it, but I think it’s a bit big for a tea cozy- after all my teapot is a little on the small side.img_3299Then, I thought, “Maybe something fancier-something more Fair Isle-y.”  I like this diamond pattern quite a bit.img_3312But, again, I think it might be too big.  So I worked up a scaled-down version of the first pattern.  Narrow stripes with teeny polka dots.  Sure, I’ll have to deal with a million little ends, but I think I like the result best.img_3304So, I’ve got my swatch and decided on my pattern.  I measured the gauge, and made sure to write it down in my book.

img_3344I’ve taken my measurements and have a plan in my head.  Next time, we’ll get down into the nitty-gritty of math.

Don’t forget!  I’ve got 2 (count ’em!) giveaways going on as we speak.  Comment here for a chance to win a copy of On the Go Knits, or here for a chance to win Knits for Everybody!

Pattern: Bitterlake Cardigan

I’ve got a new pattern!

And I’m so happy with this one.  (Sure, I’m happy with all of my patterns, otherwise I wouldn’t  publish them, but still.)  I’m so proud of how it turned out!

My pattern is in Knit Pick’s new collection, Creative Color: 2016 Fair Isle Collection.33010This collection is so pretty- I can’t stand it.

Happily Sweater by Katy Banks

33010106Summer Wanes Cowl and Hat by Heather Storta

33010114And in among all the gorgeous patters, I’d like to introduce you to my sweater, the Bitterlake Cardigan!52092220_23 copyIt’s a zip-up cardigan, knit back and forth in a single piece (no seaming!), with a little bit of shaping at the sides for a nice fit.  But the best part (so excited about this bit!) is the Fair Isle button band/neckband/hem combo.  It’s worked in the round using 5 colors (4 shades of brown, and a contrasting saffron orange), then backed  with a facing to cover all the floats for a really professional finish.52092220_12 copyI love how the designs on the bands match up, and I love the practicality of a zippered cardigan.52092220_2 copyHead on over to Knit Picks if you want a copy of this collection!  It’s so good!

OR! If you want to try your luck, comment below with your favorite pattern for a chance to win your very own copy of Creative Color!  

Pattern: Ride the Rails

What?  Another new pattern?!  (I said I had two patterns in the new Knit Picks collection… did you catch that?)32752[1]This one is  awesome, too (if I say so myself).

My Ride the Rails Scarf is a double-sided scarf, complete with three-color colorwork and knit with sock yarn on teeny tiny needles.  So, I’d say it is slightly more “tricksy” than my usual patterns.

51974220_7_medium[1]But, as much of an undertaking as it may be to make one of these scarves, the finished product is totally worth it.  The double-layer knitting makes the scarf lovely and warm, the gauge makes the scarf feel totally luxurious, and the three colors can be customized to match your favorite winter coat.

51974220_10_medium2[1]Get your copy of the collection from KnitPicks!

Or, reply to Wednesday’s post to enter into the drawing for a free copy of the book!

Inspiration: Aurora Borealis

Supposedly, there’s a big solar flare happening right now.  And, supposedly, that means that we will be able to see the Northern Lights tonight.  It seems that somehow a solar flare leads to the Northern Lights showing up.  How that happens, as a non-astronomy-inclined person, is a big mystery to me.  (My husband has tried to explain it to me… I can’t make heads or tails of it.)

016[1]I’ve heard before that we were supposed to see the northern lights from the PNW, but I’ve still never seen them.  Maybe they show up after I go to bed.  Maybe you have to go out of town to see them.  Maybe the Aurora Borealis is actually a myth, like unicorns, wizards, or the Loch Ness Monster.

aurora-borealis-wallpaper[1]I read one article that said that you’ll see them better if you use your camera to take a long-exposure photo of the sky.  That just sounds like ghost-hunter-type behavior, to me.  “I swear, if you just point your camera over here for a few minutes, you’re bound to pick up something.  So what if you can’t see it now?”

aurora-borealis-northern-lights_1280x1024_159-standard[1]I might be a little pessimistic about my chances of actually seeing the Aurora Borealis tonight, but that doesn’t mean I won’t look for it, and it certainly doesn’t mean I don’t think it’s beautiful.

In fact, I think I’ll celebrate the Northern Lights by looking at some beautiful projects, filled with luminous, shifting colors, just like (hopefully) the sky tonight.

Revontuli -huivi/Northern Lights by AnneM

1503583993_9aa8397e28_z[1]knit/lab Colorwork Crescent by Kieran FoleyColourwork_mystery-7_medium2[1]

Paintbox Log Cabin Blanket by Katherine Keyes1532025337_64dd0cea32_z[1]

Pattern: Hellenic Pullover

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAHey, did you like my Ravellenic Games sweater?  Want to make one yourself?  I wrote out a pattern!  (Word of warning, it’s the first time I’ve really written out a full-on-sweater-in-multiple-sizes pattern, so there might be some math errors.  I tried to make all the math come out right, but you never know.)

Anyway, this sweater is a simple top down yoke pullover with slip-stitch colorwork at shoulders, hem and cuffs. A few short rows at the back of the neck make the sweater lay nicely over your shoulders, and a rolled ribbing collar gives this sweater a beautiful finish. It’s knit a fairly large gauge with cozy (and affordable) Knit Picks’ Wool of the Andes, making it perfect for when you want a new hand-knit sweater right now.

The pattern is available here:

Hellenic Pullover

Ravelry

 

Accross the Finish Line

Phew!  The Olympics are over, and the Ravellenic Games are finished!  I don’t know if you took part, but I had a really great time.  And I knit like a Norwegian cross-country skier (in other words- really, really quickly).

My sweater came together without too much trouble.  I did have a little issue during the first weekend of the games, when I had a little math issue (compounded by the fact that I – overachiever that I am – was trying to finish an entire sweater in a week) that forced me to re-knit my sleeves a couple times.  (Apparently my arms are not 12 inches long and pointy.  Who knew?)  But, other than that, I skated through this project at a nice little clip.

Anyway, here’s my final product in all it’s glory!  (Please ignore the slightly awkward poses.  I can make a sweater in two weeks, but I’m damned if I can take a decent photograph.  It’s a curse.)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI blocked the sleeves slightly too much, so they’re a smidge long, but that’s OK.  I have long monkey arms, so it’s sometimes a treat to have too-long sleeves.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI love how the slip-stitch color-work panels turned out.  (And they were crazy easy to do!  I’ll post instructions soon.  Maybe Wednesday, if I have time.)

The sweater was worked in KnitPicks’ Wool of the Andes, and the colors were:

  • Sapphire Heather (body)
  • Bluebird (darker contrast blue)
  • Clarity (pale contrast blue)
  • Papaya Heather (orange)
  • Fairy Tale (fuchsia)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERADespite the dorky pictures, I’m quite pleased how this project turned out.

Did you participate in the Ravellenics?  What did you make?

Inspiration: The Dreaded Christmas Sweater

You’ve got to love a holiday that comes with its own genre of knitwear.  Unfortunately, Christmas Sweaters have gotten a bad rap, and now the only times you see them are either:

  1. On your Great Aunt Muriel.
  2. On the receptionist at your middle school.  The one with the big glasses and puffy, permed hair.
  3. At ugly sweater parties.

Not fair, I say!

Let’s take a look at some Christmas Sweaters that aren’t that bad.

Not a traditional Christmas Sweater, but totally adorable.  And, I’m sure, super toasty for walks over the river and through the snow.

Boreal by Kate Davies6494110639_e32809410e_z[1]

A 1950s-inspired shape with adorable little reindeer and a neat triangle pattern on the front.

The Perfect Christmas Jumper by Susan Crawford

Photo2_medium2[1]

OK, so this one is definitely Christmas-y.  But, look, you can choose between plum pudding, snowmen, and Christmas Pigs!  (All right, they’re probably supposed to be reindeer, but with their little pink noses, they totally look like pigs.  I suppose you could change their antlers into little pointy ears if you wanted to really run with the whole Christmas Pigs angle.)

Love Yarn Christmas Jumper by Fiona Bennet

10052632855_4df4e5940d_z[1]But, you know what?  The Christmas Sweater is so earnest, so self-aware, and so uncaring of what people think of it.  The Christmas Sweater knows what it is, and is completely OK with its cheerful tackiness.  I can’t let a post about Christmas Sweaters go by without including an actual, honest-to-goodness tacky Christmas Sweater.    So here you go:

Patons Christmas Sweaters by Patons UK

xmasjumper_medium2[1]